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Kinetic Photography – Physiograms

with 6 comments

Saw this technique in this month’s Practical Photography. One shot that grabbed my interest as I flicked through the magazine was of a Physiogram by a chap called James Hart . The afternoon wouldn’t go fast enough until I could get home and try some for myself.

The technique is simple.

  1. Place your camera on the floor facing upwards. If you have a remote control connect it up.
  2. suspend a light source directly above the camera on a piece of string. For my test shots I used a maglite with the front section removed so the bulb is exposed. I think they call this candle mode.
  3. In an auto mode with autofocus on, hold something where the light source will be and take a shot to set the focus distance.
  4. Without changing the focus switch it to manual focus.
  5. Set the camera to manual and to a narrow f stop – I went for f22. Set the exposure time to a long exposure 15 seconds or more or bulb mode.
  6. Set the light source swinging and fire the shutter.
  7. Experiment…

Further examples of the test shots can be found in the Kinetic Photography – Physiograms set on my Flickr page.

Photography magazines all seem to contain the same old stuff but yet I do find myself still buying them. I was quite pleased to see a number of Holga shots in Practical Photography as the whole lofi movement seems to be largely ignored by most of the magazines out there.

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Written by ukenaut

February 4, 2008 at 10:32 pm

6 Responses

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  1. I learn from you daily.

    Kirsty

    February 5, 2008 at 3:58 am

  2. Hi Ian,

    Love it. Sally told me about it. Gonna grab the 400D and a torch!…….

    Scott

    February 10, 2008 at 10:58 pm

  3. Hi Ian,

    You do great!

    I wonder if you would like to tell me how you do “snow falling”.
    It’s amazing!!!!!!!
    I do love it very much.
    Alice

    Allegraka

    December 9, 2008 at 8:45 am

  4. […] More details of how these images were made at h4num4n.wordpress.com/2008/02/04/kinetic-photography-phys… […]

  5. […] More details of how these images were made at h4num4n.wordpress.com/2008/02/04/kinetic-photography-phys… […]

  6. […] More details of how these images were made at h4num4n.wordpress.com/2008/02/04/kinetic-photography-phys… […]


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